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Need To Know Nightclubs In Korea

Not that it’s hard to meet people in Korea; particularly the opposite sex. But sometimes you just want to getaway from the routine of teaching and home and home and teaching. It gets tedious and a night out just does it sometimes. Here are some need to know nightclubs in Korea. Nightlife in Seoul is pretty good but in other cities it can be a bit of a problem. In Yeosu for example where I spent 2 years, there was no real nightclub; at least not in the Western sense. In Busan there are a few but three hours on a bus for a night out got rough. Gwangju was the next and closest option. Here are some nightclubs you will be sure to have a good time at in Korea. 1. Foxy’s in Busan, Seomyeon neighborhood 2. Ghetto 3. Club Elune Seoul, Haeundae 4. Kino Eye 5. Gorillas 6. Club Spook 7. C...

The Initial Struggle: Life in South Korea

“Order a new laptop charger before you leave.” My mom’s words echoed in my ears as I laid on the couch in my new apartment in South Korea, alone and bored out of my mind. There was wifi here—I could see the little green light blinking on the router. I silently thanked the previous EPIK teacher for that. However, every device I’d brought with me from the U.S. was, for some reason, out of commission. So I couldn’t connect. At orientation, a friend had dropped my tablet and the screen broke. Neither my laptop nor the out-of-date smartphone I’d brought had chargers. So although the little light on the router blinked green, I had no internet connectivity that first weekend in my apartment here in South Korea. I lay on the couch and looked at the little prepaid phone my recruiter had given me wh...

An experience in Korea: What if no one is there to pick you up? [Video]

An experience in Korea – What if no one is there to pick you up? [tab: Find your way as a new teacher in Korea] You have applied, you have gotten the job and now you are ready for Korea. You are excited, nervous and outright scared. But at the same time, you are ready for the adventure. Now imagine this situation. You arrive at the airport and even though you arranged everything with your recruiter and school, no one is there to pick you up. What will you do? Really, what if no one is there to pick you up? I am not writing this to scare you. It has happened to a few teachers and it happened to me when I arrived in Incheon. I had no idea where to go or what to do and I want to share that experience in Korea and help you prepare for the worst possible scenario while hoping for the best...

Staying in Korea after your teaching contract is up, can you do it?

So your contract is up and done, is staying in Korea a good idea?     This is a question I get all the time. And recently a reader emailed me asking it. So I thought it was time to write a post about it. Let’s get straight to it. The short answer is yes you can. Staying in Korea is a great idea but there are a few things to keep in mind. Change your Visa status Remember that you generally have about fourteen days to go to immigration and report your change in visa status. They will give you a month from when your job ended to leave the country. Even if your Alien Registration Card (ARC) is good for a month after your contract ends, you’re still required to report your change in employment status when your job ends. But here is what you can do to stay in the country lo...

Teaching English in Korea: A note to new teachers

A note to those who will be teaching English in Korea It is hiring season again, at least for public schools that is. Hagwons are always hiring. This means a slew of new teachers will be coming in to fill up the vacant positions left by teachers leaving in February. Are you one of those who will be teaching English in Korea? Here are a few things to keep in mind on your arrival. No Internet or cellphone It is very likely that you will go for a few days, a week or even longer without internet or a way to contact your friends and family from within your apartment. Don’t despair. And you won’t if you know your options and that’s why I am writing this post. There are many other ways you can reach friends and family back home and let them know that you have arrived in Korea sa...

Expat in Korea: 6 Ways to Deal with the Communication Problem

As an expat in Korea, all too often we all get caught in the web and find ourselves in the middle of a communication problem that could have easily been averted if someone just spoke to the English Teacher. It happens way too often and if you have taught or have been teaching as an expat in Korea, then you know exactly what I am talking about. Just yesterday I was told that I need to turn in 11 lesson plans for an extra class I have been teaching to increase the English level of the middle school students who are new to the English language. I was not told about this at the beginning of the class that started two months ago. All it would have taken is someone saying, ‘Hey English Teacher, you will need to turn in the lesson plans that you have to make up yourself because there is no ...

Living in Korea: What if you lose your Alien Registration Card?

This article was updated 6-19-2018 So you’re living in Korea as an expat, and you lose your Alien Registration Card, what are you going to do? Your Alien Registration Card (ARC) is your official registration with Korean immigration and proof that you belong and is living in Korea legally. But what happens if you lose this card? There is a lot of controversial, compelling and even outright wrong stories about what to do if you lose your card. I’ve been living in Korea for quite some time now I am here to set the record straight being that I have had hands-on experience on the matter. Some people say you will pay heavy fines. Others say you have to file a police report first before going to immigration so that they have proof that you lost it. As if you report it lost or stolen t...